The Pyrenees---Southern France

The Pyrenees---Southern France

Thursday, October 11, 2012

My "Hope" Came True

       For quite a while, I read as C. Hope Clark charted her novel's progress via encouraging posts. When Lowcountry Bribe came out, I was unable to run out and buy her book because I was buried under a tower of books I had borrowed from friends. (Right now, only an arm is peeking out from under that heap.)



     However, I was sure that--soon--I would read her novel. After all, Hope is a writer's writer. After hearing stories of the conception, the discomfort as things shifted, the labor pains...I was looking forward to seeing her new baby.

     And fortunate me, a copy dropped right into my lap. Barbara Younger had a give-away, and I won.

      Today it came winging my way and landed in my mail box. I read the inscription, and then turned to the first page. For many readers, that's what hooks them. if the first sentence doesn't reach out and grab 'em, they'll put the book back on the shelf.

       Here is Hope's first line:  "O postive primer wasn't quite the color I had in mind for the small office, but Lucas Sherwood hadn't given the decor a second thought when he blew out the left side of his brain with a .45." What a wonderfu line to start your novel with.

        And speaking of minds, I have not yet made the final decision about my NaNoWriMo 2012. If you have a first line that's been discarded, please send it to me. I will gladly you half credit for the steaming pile of poop manuscript.

       So, how 'bout it? Do you have a first line to spare?

20 comments:

  1. Sioux, you are a winner all the way around. Once you start Hope's book, you won't be able to put it down.

    First sentence for you to toy with: I found a nugget hidden in my husband's briefs.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Linda--Too late. I'm already immersed in it...

    I like the nugget line. Now all I need is a plot line--the whole arc--and I'm good to go. ;)

    ReplyDelete
  3. You've more than proven you have the chops to come up with a riveting first line all by yourself. I'm looking forward to reading it. :)

    ReplyDelete
  4. Lisa--I am not sure I deserve that, but thanks.

    Yeah, I'm looking forward to it, too. ;)

    ReplyDelete
  5. "It was a dark and stormy night"?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. And if I used that line, would you SNOOP around and check out my story?

      Delete
  6. So enamored of the new minister was Mrs. Cuttlebone that she chased him round and round the pulpit until he tired, a fait accompli which resulted in squeals of delight as she caught him by the organ.

    You're welcome. I don't even want half credit. It's all yours. Enjoy.

    ReplyDelete
  7. YAY for you, for winning another book! My first lines pretty much stink. Thank goodness for rewrites!

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  8. Sioux, I am in awe of your diligence in posting regularly. You are an inspiration. Congrats on the win and thanks for the ride.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Barbara--Thanks for going. It's always nicer to ride with someone than ride alone.

      And you know I'm in awe of your ability to write poetry that always has a rhyme scheme. Yikes!

      Delete
  9. That's two books I can't wait to read - C. Hope Clark's and yours. I'm with Lisa; you will come up with your own and it will be wonderful. Though Val had me at "Mrs. Cuttlebone."

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Tammy--Yeah, I can't wait to read mine either--as long as it's not a steaming pile of **it when it's finished.

      I'll loan you the book. I just finished it this evening.

      Delete
  10. "It was not a dark and stormy night as predicted, but a perfect October Harvest Moon kind of night, with such bright intensity flooding the garden that anybody just passing by could plainly see Melanie ..." I almost had an idea of what she'd be doing but then I decided not to spoil your chance at creating the suspense. I'm considerate that way. You're welcome.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Marcia--I'll say it again.

      You are a fabricator.
      An embellisher.
      A writer of fiction.
      A li**.

      Thanks for the first line.

      Delete
  11. When i got outside, i looked around at all the mini vans with child seats and decided you all weren't that intimidating, so snuck back in to answer the ?.
    (you really should hire a bouncer)
    Hunter thompson is my hero.
    I'd like to work for some afternoon rag in the 60's. Be sitting in some dive bar in my bad hat tryin to beat a deadline with a head swimming in gin.
    Or be down at Tootsie's in nashville with harlan howard at I0am writing bad country songs fueled by bloody mary's.
    Does that make me bad?

    ReplyDelete
  12. Sheesh! See how confused i get in a house full of girls? I left my last comment in the wrong room. Was s'posed to go in the next door down. Sorry
    So now i'm stuck. Guess i have to make an offering.
    How bout "call me ismael"?
    No? Didn't think so.
    I'm escaping before the alarms go off! Bye

    ReplyDelete
  13. OOPS!
    ie~Ishmael
    And in the other room~mostest, not mostness.(but same effect)
    HELP!
    Don't block me Sioux, i swear i'll never darken your door again
    HELP!!

    ReplyDelete
  14. Someone gave a writing prompt one time to pick up the book nearest you, take their first line and start your own story. It worked for me, I wrote a novella by starting with the first line from Christy. Since then, the first line has changed quite a bit, but it started me on my story.

    ReplyDelete

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